In Third Grade students will acquire the following skills:

Reading:

  • Increase text complexity in reading
  • Balance fictional and informational texts
  • Build content-area knowledge
  • Use comprehension strategies
    • draw conclusions
    • main idea
    • author’s purpose
    • sequencing
    • compare and contrast
    • make predictions
    • fact vs. opinions
    • cause and effect
  • Identify story elements
    • character
    • setting
    • plot
  • Identify different story genre
    • realism
    • fantasy
    • realistic fiction
    • non-fiction
    • expository nonfiction
    • biographies
    • narrative nonfiction
    • Read at least 110 words per minute with good comprehension, expression, and fluency.

Spelling:

  • Arrange words in alphabetical order to the third letter
  • Correctly spell basic sight words and/or frequently used words
  • Correctly spell words with consonant sounds (digraphs and blends)
  • Correctly spell various vowel sounds
  • Add prefixes and suffixes to words appropriately
  • Correctly spell irregular verbs
  • Correctly spell irregular plural nouns
  • Correctly spell common compound words
  • Identify the two words that form a contraction
  • Form contractions
  • Make structural changes to spell words correctly (ex. add inflectional endings, drop silent e, double final consonants, change the “Y” to an “I” before adding -ing)
  • Correctly spell homophones

Writing and Grammar:

  • identify and provide examples of nouns as subjects and direct objects
  • identify and use past, present, and future verb tenses properly
  • categorize verbs as regular or irregular
  • recognize helping verbs and action verbs
  • define and give examples of singular, plural, and possessive pronouns
  • recognize that adjectives describe things
  • recognize adverbs
  • identify the subject and predicate of a simple sentence
  • use capitalization appropriately
    • capitalize the first word of a quotation, dialogue, sentence, and poetry line
    • capitalize all proper nouns
  • use commas in dates, locations, addresses, and for listing items in a series
  • use commas correctly after a greeting and closing in a letter
  • use apostrophes in contractions, omissions, and to show possession
  • use the writing process to develop good writing skills
    • prewriting
    • drafting
    • revising
    • editing
    • publishing
  • use a variety of prewriting activities such as brainstorming, clustering, illustrating, and webbing
  • demonstrate their writing skills through a variety of mediums including: paragraphs, short stories, poetry, reports, and friendly letters
  • use complete sentences to write a composition with a clearly identified beginning, middle, and end
  • use complete sentences to write a composition with a main idea and specific relevant details withs a variety of sentences and vivid word choices
  • use transitional words in paragraph development
  • incorporate information from multiple sources in writing reports
  • edit their writing to improve style, structure, grammar, spelling, and clarity

Math:

  • Identify and describe whole-number patterns and solve problems
  • Round 2-digit and 3-digit numbers to the nearest ten or hundred
  • Use a variety of strategies to add and subtraction 3-digit numbers
  • Organize data in tables and solve problems
  • Read and interpret data on a picture graph, a scaled bar graph, and a line plot
  • Draw a picture graph, scaled bar graph, and a line plot
  • Use arrays to model products and factors
  • Model the Commutative Property of Multiplication and use it to find products
  • Model multiplication with the factors 1 through 10
  • Use the Distributive Property to find products by breaking apart arrays
  • Use the Associative Property of Multiplication to multiply three factors
  • Identify and explain patterns on the multiplication table
  • Solve division problems
  • model division by using equal groups and bar models
  • relate multiplication and division facts as inverse operations
  • divide using a variety of strategies to divide by 1 through 10
  • perform operations in order when there are no parentheses
  • explore and identify equal parts of a whole
  • read, write, and model fractions
  • represent and locate fractions on a number line
  • recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers
  • compare and order fractions with the same denominator or numerator
  • model equivalent fractions
  • Read, write, and tell time on analog and digital clocks to the nearest minute and decide when to use A.M. and P.M.
  • measure time intervals between starting and ending times
  • measure length to the nearest half or fourth inch and use measurement data to make a line plot
  • Estimate and measure liquid volume in liters and mass in grams and kilograms
  • Estimate, measure, and find perimeter and area of polygons
  • Find the unknown length of a side of a polygon when you know its perimeter
  • Identify and describe attributes, angles, and line segments of plane shapes
  • Describe, classify, and compare quadrilaterals and triangles

Science

  • Explore Earth Science through a study of weather patterns
    • Understand characteristics of sun, wind, water cycle, and nature of storms
    • Understand causes of specific weather patterns in different climates
    • Understand effects of weather on humans
    • Show we predict and prepare for hazardous weather
  • Units of Life and Ecosystems and Forces and Interactions are currently under development by Carolina Science - Expectations will be published upon the presentation of the these brand new units.

Social Studies:

  • Explain how their own community and communities around the world are alike and different
  • Show how people in communities depend on each other
  • Explain how communities around the world are connected
  • Identify types of land and bodies of water that can be found in communities around the world
  • Explain how land, water, and other natural features of a community affect the people that live there
  • Understand that people depend on land and water to live
  • Understand that people change their surroundings to meet their needs
  • Understand the history of the United States and how its communities have changed and stayed the same over time
  • Explore the history of their own community and country
  • Understand how and why people change communities
  • Understand the structure of their local, state, and national governments
  • Understand the role of what each government does and who their leaders are
  • Understand why people move from place to place and how communities are affected by these movements
  • Show how people express and share their culture with others in a variety of ways
  • Explain the different cultural influences in their own communities
  • Show how people work in the community
  • Understand how businesses operate
  • Understand the concept of trade and its impact around the world
  • Explain how people make decisions about their money that benefits from their community and for themselves
Bornblum Jewish Comminity School.

Bornblum Jewish Comminity School.